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Can You Get it Right? My favorite checkride question

General Aviation News

Jason Schappert, the force behind MZeroA.com, just posted a video, “My Favorite Checkride Question.”

He notes: “I get the benefit of sitting in on a lot of checkrides. When you sit in as many as I do you start to see common themes despite the tests being administered by different DPEs (Designated Pilot Examiners).

The question: “You’re recovering from an unusual attitude. What is the first instrument you’re going to look at?”

Instrument Ground School Oct 14 and 15

Next PRIVATE PILOT GROUND SCHOOL will be November 18 and 19.
Here’s details about the October Instrument Class.

·        What: Instrument Ground School

·        When: Saturday, October 14, & Sunday, October 15, 8AM to 5PM

·        Where: 534 Air Harbor Rd.GreensboroNC 27455

·        Guarantee:  I guarantee students pass the instrument written; if they do not pass, I work with them one-on-one until they do pass

  • THIS GUARANTEE WILL ONLY BE HONORED IF CLASS PARTICIPANTS TAKE THE FAA KNOWLEDGE TEST AT OR BEFORE SUNDAY, OCT 29, 2017.
  • Items to Bring: An E6B, pocket calculator, and something to write with.  We do have E6Bs for sale at our cost of $11.00
  • Extras: We provide doughnuts and coffee for breakfast, ham sandwiches for lunch, and we also have soft drinks and water
  • Cost: $300.00 Cash or Check: Make checks payable to: Zenda Liess
  • We collect the fee the first morning before class
  • To Register: Call or e-mail (see contact information below)

Webinar – Beyond the Weather Brief – Quick Steps to Improving Weather Certainty – FAASafety.gov

FAA Safety Team | Safer Skies Through Education
“Beyond the Weather Brief – Quick Steps to Improving Weather Certainty”

Topic: Using weather detection tools to improve certainty and safety in your briefing.
On Wednesday, July 19, 2017 at 19:30 EDT
Select Number:
WP0177191

Description:

The world of weather briefings is changing!  How do you make sense of conflicting information on a weather brief: There’s an AIRMET for IFR but numerous products disagree. Which one is right?  There’s a few forecasts for Gusts to 40 knots, but no AIRMET or CWA. How do you validate that?

In this 60 minute webinar followed by a Q&A, Delia Colvin, aviation weather expert, will show you effective ways to gain certainty and safety while evaluating the information. You’ll also become familiar with some fantastic new tools.

Click here to register today

To view further details and registration information for this webinar, click here.

The sponsor for this seminar is: FAASTeam

The following credit(s) are available for the WINGS/AMT Programs:

Basic Knowledge 3 – 1 Credit
Advanced Knowledge 1 – 1 Credit

Click here to view the WINGS help page

Private Pilot Ground School – Greensboro

  • What: Private Pilot Ground School
  • When: Saturday & Sunday, July 15 and 16, from 8 AM to 5 PM, both days
  • Where: 534 Air Harbor Rd., Greensboro, NC 27455
  • Sign-Off: I provide the endorsement required to take the knowledge test
  • Guarantee:  I guarantee students pass the private pilot knowledge test; if they don’t pass, I work with them one-on-one until they do pass, Or they can take one of my future private pilot ground schools at no charge
  • THIS GUARANTEE WILL ONLY BE HONORED IF CLASS PARTICIPANTS TAKE THE FAA KNOWLEDGE TEST AT OR BEFORE SUNDAY, JULY 30, 2017.
  • Items to Bring: An E6B, a plotter, pocket calculator, and something to write with.  I have E6Bs and plotters available for sale at my cost of $11.00 for E6Bs and $11.00 for rotating plotters (or $22.00 total for both).
  • Extras: Doughnuts and coffee for breakfast, ham sandwiches for lunch, and we also have soft drinks and water
  • Cost: $300.00 Cash or Check, with checks payable to Zenda Liess; fee is collected first morning before class. Sorry, I don’t do credit cards!
  • To Register: Call or e-mail (see contact information below)

Zenda Liess
534 Air Harbor Rd.
Greensboro, NC 27455
zendaliess@aol.com
Home: 336 286-5218
Cell: 336 324-9595

“Glide Ratio – Managing Engine Failure in IMC”

FAA Safety Team | Safer Skies Through Education
You have asked us to notify you when a seminar is scheduled that meets your criteria. The following seminar may be of interest to you:

“Glide Ratio – Managing Engine Failure in IMC”
Topic: Glide Ratio – Managing Engine Failure in IMC. Presented by Chad Hilty, Burlington EAA IMC Club president and FAASTeam Rep.
On Thursday, June 22, 2017 at 18:00 Eastern Daylight Time
Location:
Elon Aviation Hangar
3445 North Aviation Drive

Burlington, NC 27215
Select Number:
EA3976862

Description:

Glide Ratio – Managing Engine Failure in IMC. Presented by Chad Hilty, Burlington EAA IMC Club president and FAASTeam Representative. This presentation will cover a scenario regarding engine out procedures in IMC. Please come prepared with knowlege of the glide ratio and emergency procedures for the aircraft that you normally fly. We will discuss emergency options, energy mangament and provide some tip and tricks regarding forced landing, gear management (for retractables) and unique aspects of managing this emergency situation in IMC – including pointers from the book Engine Out: Survival Tactics, 2016 by Nate S. “Buster” Jaros.

EAA IMC Club, through its nationwide chapters, provides organized “hangar flying” focused on building instrument flying, knowledge and skills. The organization network promotes a safety culture through continued education and believes that safety and proficiency are developed through education and experience. Monthly Meetings offer an opportunity to share in-flight experiences and valuable safety tips. Through the FAA Safety Program, informative WINGS presentations are offered by aviation professionals. You do not have to be a rated instrument pilot to attend. Membership in the international EAA IMC Club is encouraged. Click the link below and register TODAY.

To view further details and registration information for this seminar, click here.

The sponsor for this seminar is: FAA Safety Team and the Greensboro FSDO

The FAA Safety Team (FAASTeam) is committed to providing equal access to this meeting/event for all participants. If you need alternative formats or services because of a disability, please communicate your request as soon as possible with the person in the ‘Contact Information’ area of the meeting/event notice. Note that two weeks is usually required to arrange services.

The following credit(s) are available for the WINGS/AMT Programs:

June 24 25 IFR Class in Greensboro

Enjoy the summer, spread the word!  The next private pilot ground school will be July 15 and 16.

·        What: Instrument Ground School

·        When: Saturday, June 24 and Sunday, June 25, 8AM to 5PM

·        Where: 534 Air Harbor Rd., Greensboro, NC 27455

·        Guarantee:  I guarantee students pass the instrument written; if they do not pass, I work with them one-on-one until they do pass

  • THIS GUARANTEE WILL ONLY BE HONORED IF CLASS PARTICIPANTS TAKE THE FAA KNOWLEDGE TEST AT OR BEFORE SUNDAY, JULY 9, 2017.
  • Items to Bring: An E6B, pocket calculator, and something to write with.  We do have E6Bs for sale at our cost of $11.00
  • Extras: We provide doughnuts and coffee for breakfast, ham sandwiches for lunch, and we also have soft drinks and water
  • Cost: $300.00 Cash or Check: Make checks payable to: Zenda Liess
  • We collect the fee the first morning before class
  • To Register: Call or e-mail (see contact information below)



Zenda Liess
534 Air Harbor Rd.
Greensboro, NC 27455
zendaliess@aol.com
Home: 336 286-5218
Cell: 336 324-9595

 

Laid-off plant worker soars to new career as commercial pilot

WRAL.com

After being let go from his job building parts for Ford trucks, Victor Dukuh decided to pursue his dream of being a pilot.

Commercial airline pilot Victor Dukuh recalls how only a few short years ago, his life changed after he was let go from his position at a plant building parts for Ford trucks.

“When I was laid off,” he said, “instead of seeing it as a major blow, I chose to see it as an opportunity to pursue my lifelong dream of being a pilot.”

In 1998, Dukuh and his family left Ghana in West Africa. They settled in North Carolina and began working hard to achieve their piece of the American dream. Even as he worked 12-hour night shifts in the manufacturing plant, Dukuh was developing a plan to become a pilot.

“I spent hours in my off-time practicing on the Microsoft Flight Simulator,” he recalled. “This software let me practice flying and landing different common aircrafts, and showed me I had the ability to actually do this.”

MAKING THE DREAM A REALITY

Dukuh said he began doing online research to find the best path to becoming a pilot in the Triad area of North Carolina. This led him to apply for an associate’s degree program at Guilford Tech Community College.

After being accepted, he began to study and train for a career in aviation through the program. Local flight schools covered parts of the training outside of class, and certifications he received would then count as credits towards the degree.

When asked about his time at GTCC, Dukuh said, “It’s the professors that make the program so successful. They are dedicated to the students and to the school.”

After graduation, Dukuh took a 90-day course to become a flight instructor, adding to his training. The Triad Aviation Academy hired him on as an instructor, where he enjoyed three years of experience training prospective pilots. He said it was a rewarding job as he was able to help others achieve their dreams to become certified pilots, just as he had recently done.

COMMERCIAL AIRLINE PILOT

In February 2014, however, Dukuh decided it was time to move on and joined Mesa Airlines as a commercial pilot.

Mesa Airlines provides crew to American Airlines and United Airlines. They have bases in Washington, D.C., Dallas, Houston and Phoenix. He has now reached the rank of captain and flies a CRJ-900 out of Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport.

“I’d encourage people interested to look into becoming a pilot,” Dukuh remarked when asked about life as a pilot. “There is a lot of demand, and [GTCC] is considered one of the best places to get your start.”

Dukuh said he is grateful to GTCC and its associate’s degree in Aviation Management and Career Pilot Technology Program for making his dream of becoming a pilot a reality.

“I’m now really happy with my career in the aviation field and see being laid off from the plant as a blessing in disguise.”

Triad college names director of newest aviation program

Katie Arcieri – Triad Business Journal

Guilford Technical Community College said Monday that it has named Daniel Reed as program director of the college’s new aerostructures manufacturing and repair degree program that will begin this fall.

Under Reed, the college’s program will “prepare students to assemble, fabricate, inspect, manufacture, repair, test and manage the construction of aerostructures in an industrial setting, as well as in other areas of the advanced manufacturing world,” according to school officials.

Reed has been named program director after years of planning by GTCC, whose new program complements the school’s other aviation concentrations in aviation management, career pilot, aviation technologies and avionics. The fifth degree program will also include work dealing with cabin solutions and interiors to assist area aviation manufacturers.

“It is a great honor to be part of the development and implementation of a new aviation program at this institution,” Reed said. “I have several years of experience in aviation and production management. I know what the aerospace industry is looking for in a new employee, and I want to be part of creating that.”

Reed has a dozen years of experience in aircraft maintenance, manufacturing, and flight operations and most recently worked as a production manager for HAECO Cabin Solutions, where he managed the sub-assembly and final assembly of airliner passenger seats, as well as a plastic thermoforming and CNC routing manufacturing shop.

He began his aviation career as a structural mechanic in the U.S. Air Force at Pope Air Force Base, N.C. and as a helicopter pilot in the U.S. Army.

“Dan brings real-time, local aerospace manufacturing experience to the aviation programs at GTCC,” said Nick Yale, Director of Aviation at GTCC. “This local experience is key in ensuring the programs we develop meet local employer’s needs, with students progressing through the program. Dan’s contacts in aviation manufacturing locally and nationally also will benefit GTCC by giving us technical support as we grow and mature the program.”

High schooler’s love for flying reaffirmed during Brunswick County job shadow day

PortCityDaily.com

What’s life like in the “real” world? More than 60 South Brunswick High School students  tasted reality recently as part of job shadow day put on in conjunction with the Career Ready program at Brunswick County Schools.

With help from The Southport-Oak Island Area Chamber of Commerce Education Committee, Brunswick County Career Ready helped 64 students participate in the opportunity to explore a wide variety of careers.

From left-to-right: Howie Franklin of Cape Fear Regional Jetport, Booke Demonbreun and Rich Largent of Experimental Aircraft Association Chapter 939. Photo courtesy- Karen Sphar.
From left-to-right: Howie Franklin of Cape Fear Regional Jetport, Booke Demonbreun and Rich Largent of Experimental Aircraft Association Chapter 939. (Photo courtesy of Karen Sphar)

Thirty-five businesses, ranging from government offices to locally owned companies, gave students a chance to learn the ins and outs of a typical day in the office.  To getting a better understanding of what it means to be a professional from the clothes you wear to the importance of being on time, students gained a range of knowledge.

“It is such an important time in the lives of these students,” said Karen Sphar, executive vice-president for Southport-Oak Island Area Chamber of Commerce.  “Anything we can do to assist the student in making a better career choice is so worth any effort.”

Amy Sanders, Career Ready Coordinator, made presentations to juniors and seniors looking to take part in job shadowing. Students listed their top three career interests and once applications were collected, Sanders compiled a list to make job placements. A folder for each student with contact information and career-related materials was handed out leading up to a brief orientation before each of the students set sights on a day in the “real” world.

After gaining of love for flying as a young girl who spent time in the air as early as 8 years old, Brooke DeMonbreun was eager to get to the Cape Fear Regional Jetport for career advice.

“The reason I wanted to job shadow at the jetport was because when I was a little girl my father, sister and I would attend ‘Big Toy Day,’” DeMonbreun said.  “The event consisted of pilots volunteering their time and it really made me catch interest in aircrafts.

South Brunswick student Anna Cohen spent her job shadowing day with local attorney Bonner Stiller. Photo courtesy- Karen Sphar.
South Brunswick student Anna Cohen spent her job shadowing day with local attorney Bonner Stiller. Photo courtesy- Karen Sphar.

“Only being 8 at the time made me very nervous, but I remember gently grabbing the controls and going side to side and up and down. Since Big Toy Day, my dad and I sometimes drive to the end of the runway at the jetport and watch the military take off and land the Osprey for practice. I’ve always told my father that I want to fly one day.”

As the senior at South Brunswick High School prepares for graduation and Appalachian State University in the fall, Demonbreun is not totally sure what she’d like to study, possibly nursing or environmental science. But, her recent time at the jetport helped her get a clearer picture as to why she should get into a field she enjoys, just like when she was a young girl in the sky.

“While job shadowing with Mr. Howie, he gave me good information about choosing a career,” DeMonbreun added. “He described that almost every pilot he met has the biggest love with their job, so he said that whatever route I choose, it should be something I love. You could say after doing my job shadowing with Howie, he is an inspiration and someone I can look up to.”

DeMonbreun put her finger on something extremely important to our youth. Developing a passion for something and remembering no matter where life may take you during the journey, having a true love in what you do might not be considered work at all.

Currently, DeMonbreun works at Dry Street Pub and Pizza five nights a week during school and just finished her last season playing volleyball for South Brunswick. While college is right around the corner, it’s safe to say DeMonbreun not only used her experience during job shadow day to reaffirm her love for flying, but her well-rounded high school days are setting the foundation for a successful future.

“Since I have always had that passion about flying, I hope to get my private pilot’s license sometime before graduating college,” DeMonbreun said. “I know it takes a lot of time and money to do so, but since I feel so passionate about it, I think it is something to go after.”

Nontowered Case Studies – Greensboro, NC

Nontowered Case Studies – Greensboro, NC – Mar. 15, 2017

Presented by Bruce Belgum     March 15, 2017 7:00 – 9:00 p.m.

Location

Guilford Technical Community College – Aviation 1053 Old Stagecoach Trail AV3 Bldg., Room 318 Greensboro, NC 27410

Nontowered Case Studies:  What Went Wrong?

Flying at nontowered fields is a balancing act. Especially on busy days, it demands concentration, communication, sharp eyes, solid stick-and-rudder skills, and the ability to improvise at a moment’s notice. Sometimes the margin for error can be very slim.

With that in mind, ASI’s new seminar turns a spotlight on real-life accidents in the nontowered environment. Together with our expert presenters, you’ll play the role of accident investigator—starting at the crash scene and working backwards through physical evidence, eyewitness testimony, and other leads to figure out what went wrong, and why.

Sponsored by the NCDOT Division of Aviation.

Special Thanks to:  Signature Flight Support.